Thursday, June 23, 2016

Port & Sort Tote Pattern Status Update




Hello, all!

This here is my very gleeful announcement that the Port-&-Sort Tote Pattern is FINISHED and has been sent to the testing lab. 

Let us scheme together, therefore, that sometime in July, the pattern will go on sale and we can all begin making these bags, well in time for the holidays! How's that for unprocrastinating?

In the meanwhile, I will work on the free tutorial for those collapsible organizers that you can make thousands of to go with your totes, so that when the pattern goes on sale, you have everything you need to make the full "set".

Also in the meanwhile, here are the materials and skill/technique lists from the pattern. Some notes:
  • Some of the recommended materials might sound unfamiliar. If so, the third screenshot suggests alternatives of more common fabrics. That said, I really like Therma-flec (that's the silver ironing-board fabric) and ripstop nylon for the inner parts of this bag - they are light-weight and easily compressed while still feeling strong and non-cloth-like, and give a more commercial-bag than home-made feel. You easily can buy both at JoAnn here and here.
  • You will need a separating zipper. You cannot get by with a non-separating zipper - the bag will not work. I like the slightly chunkier zippers like the sort on jackets and duffles, rather than on garments and pencil cases. Again, fabric stores have them. Both nylon coil and plastic tooth zippers will work. 26" is the ideal length - it will give you some leeway when manipulating the head and tail ends into seams. However, 25" or 24" will work, too - the pattern shows you how to use shorter zippers. I would not go with a 22" or shorter zipper, unless you don't mind the bag being zipped only partway down each side.
  • You can make this bag without any strap hardware - one of the three strap variations is of a plain, fabric strap. If you'd like to try the variations with hardware and would like recommendations for stores, I buy my hardware from Singapore (not helpful, I know) and on Etsy. I regularly buy metal loops and rings and buckles and such from LoraLee's store, and I buy my invisible magnetic snaps from El's store. I buy my zippers in person from SR Harris (they're $1!) and JoAnn because I like being able to measure the lengths, check the coil size and match colors. 








Shoot me an email or leave a comment if you have any questions!




14 comments:

  1. Let's hope the testing lab is quick and efficient and unprocrastinating, too! Go, testing lab... GO!!!

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  2. Can't wait! ..it'll give me a chance to finish a few things first now!

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  3. I love the look of this patter^ I'll be there waiting for it go on sale ㅋㅋ

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  4. This bag is awesome. Some day I hope to make one.

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  5. Could cotton, poly, or nylon webbing be used for the straps? Looking forward to this pattern, too!!

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    1. Yes, Patti - that would be a quick shortcut to making your own plain fabric straps if they don't intend to use hardware. And most webbing comes in 1", which is the width of the finished straps. I think I shall put a note in the pattern to suggest ready-made straps like this webbing as an alternative to making them.

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  6. This is exactly what I need for my fabric markers for Sewing camps! If you need any more testers... :)

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  7. Yay!!! How would you feel about a sew-along?

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  8. Just wanted to thank you for all the good information you post about sewing. Your blog was one of the first I ever started reading when blogs became a thing and I still enjoy (and use!) the information you post today. Thank you!

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  9. I'm so excited! Can't wait til July!

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  10. Looking forward, like many others are. And I am very interested in the tutorial for the collapsible bins; those look so useful.

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  11. I need to make this bag. Am already trying to find Ripstop or Thermaflec in Germany, which seems to be a problem.
    Would it be possible to substitute those fabrics with laminated cotton?
    Thanks for the info!

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    1. Anonymous: yes, I think laminated plastic would work - it will make thicker seams than either Thermaflec or ripstop, so where it might be present with multiple other layers in a seam, I'd suggest alternating it with regular cotton. You could try out one Tote using just laminated cotton, to see if your sewing machine can manage all the seams, and decide if you need to substitute something thinner in some of those layers in your next Tote.

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  12. Hi Lier,

    I would love this bag, guess this would be multi purpose too.
    Can't wait for the pattern

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